Calendar

Oct
9
Fri
WE Colloquium –Moataz Attallah @ 1111 Edison Joining and Technology Center
Oct 9 @ 9:00 am – 10:00 am

WE Colloquium: Moataz Attallah, Metal Additive Manufacturing: Research Highlights

School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, UK
Friday, October 9, 2015, 9:00 am
111 Edison Joining and Technology Center
1248 Arthur Adams Dr
Columbus, OH 43221

Abstract

This presentation summarises the research activities of the Advanced Materials & Processing Lab (AMPLab) in the field of Additive Manufacturing (AM), using laser powder bed and blow powder technologies. TThe activities cover the following themes: defect formation and mitigation, post-processing of AM structures, tooling development using AM, micro and macro modelling, multi-functional AM, microstructural control, and process optimisation. The talk demonstrates some case studies in the aerospace, medical, defence, and space sectors. The talk also summarises the key metallurgical challenges that face the development and deployment of AM technologies.

Bio

Prof. Moataz Attallah holds a chair in advanced materials processing at the School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham. His research focuses on studying a number of advanced manufacturing technologies including additive manufacturing (blown powder and selective laser melting), friction-welding (friction stir, linear and rotary friction welding), and powder metallurgy of aerospace metallic materials, using electron microscopy and neutron/synchrotron X-ray diffraction. He is the director of the 35-member strong advanced materials and processing laboratory (AMPLab), with a total grant portfolio of ~ £ 8 M from UK, EU, and industrial collaborations. Prof. Attallah is also the academic leader for netshape manufacturing theme at the Manufacturing Technology Centre (MTC).

Source: https://mse.osu.edu/events/2015/10/we-colloquium-moataz-attallah-metal-additive-manufacturing-research-highlights

Mar
11
Fri
WE Colloquium – Rajiv Mishra @ Edison Joining and Tech Center, Room 111
Mar 11 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

WE Colloquium: Rajiv Mishra

Friday, March 11, 2016, 11:00 am
Edison Joining and Tech Center, Rm 111
1248 Arthur Adams Dr
Columbus, OH 43221
Sep
23
Fri
WE-MSE Colloquium- Lee Semiatin, Air Force Research Laboratory @ 264 MacQuigg Labs
Sep 23 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

WE-MSE Colloquium: Lee Semiatin, AFRL R&D on Inertia Friction Welding of Nickel-Base Superalloys

Senior Scientist, Materials Processing/Processing Science, Air Force Research Laboratory
Friday, September 23, 2016, 3:00 pm
264 MacQuigg Labs
105 W. Woodruff Ave.
Columbus, OH 43210

This will be a joint WE-MSE Colloquium held at 3:00 p.m. in 264 MacQuigg Labs.

 

Abstract

An overview of recent R&D performed by AFRL (some in conjunction with OSU) in the area of inertia friction welding (IFW) of gamma-prime-strengthened, nickel-base superalloys will be presented. This work has focused on three major areas – process mechanics, material behavior during IFW, and the joining of dissimilar alloys. Two of the key elements of the IFW process consist of friction between the mating workpieces (thereby heating the interface) and energy losses in the mechanical system per se. Methods to quantify the coefficient of friction and overall machine efficiency will be described. Second, methods to quantify transient flow behavior and the kinetics of the dissolution of gamma prime will be described. These techniques include special methods to investigate the interaction of dynamic microstructural changes and plastic flow. Last, the selection of process parameters for joining superalloys with different solvus temperatures/plastic-flow responses will be addressed. One particular method to reduce non-uniform metal flow, which involves local preheating, will be highlighted.

Bio

Dr. Lee Semiatin is Senior Scientist (ST), Materials Processing/Processing Science in the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate.  He received a BES in Mechanics from Johns Hopkins University and MS and PhD degrees in Metallurgy and Materials Science from Carnegie Mellon University.

Dr. Semiatin worked at Battelle Memorial Institute from 1978 to 1991.  Here, he conducted and directed programs for a wide range of government and industry clients.  A large portion of his government-sponsored work was for the Air Force Materials Laboratory and Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR).  This included basic studies of the workability of difficult-to-process aerospace alloys, the fundamentals of material behavior during deformation processing, and various National Aerospace Plane (NASP) – related programs.  Both the government as well as industrial programs involved a major component of technology transfer and thus working with a wide range of manufacturing companies.

In June 1991, Dr. Semiatin joined the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate as Senior Scientist for Materials Processing/Processing Science.  Under his direction, R&D has been conducted in four major areas:  advanced metallic, intermetallic, and nanocrystalline alloys; conventional titanium, nickel, and aluminum alloys; novel processes; and advanced modeling tools for the prediction of microstructure, texture, and damage evolution during deformation and solidification processing.  The integration of various modeling, characterization, and input-data tools that underlie ICMSE form a key part of current research. These efforts have led to the development of various new forging, extrusion, and rapid heat treatment processes – some of which are utilized on a production basis.  In addition, he consults regularly with a number of manufacturing vendors on material-processing problems which impact Air Force systems.

Dr. Semiatin has authored/co-authored over 400 journal papers in the area of materials processing. He has also written/edited 18 books/handbooks/conference proceedings, 27 limited distribution reports, and holds 9 patents.

Source: https://mse.osu.edu/events/2016/09/we-mse-colloquium-lee-semiatin-afrl-rd-inertia-friction-welding-nickel-base

Sep
30
Fri
WE Colloquium- Yi Huang, Tesla Motors Inc. @ 111 Edison Joining Technology Center
Sep 30 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

WE Colloquium: Yi Huang, Laser as direct and indirect source in welding process

Staff Advanced Manufacturing Engineer at Tesla Motors Inc.
Friday, September 30, 2016, 2:30 pm
111 EJTC
1248 Arthur Adams Dr
Columbus, OH 43221

Abstract

Laser, because of inherent advantages, is widely used in the industry, especially metal welding and joining. By deep exploring the principle of laser beam, it can be used as indirect and direct source to enhance or execute welding process. Traditionally considered as direct thermal source, laser can also be adopted as force source. To this end, laser enhanced GMAW was developed to realize this concept. Laser recoil pressure force was identified as the main auxiliary force to detach droplet. The electromagnetic force needed to detach droplets, thus the current that determines this force, is reduced. The undesired dependence of the metal transfer on the current is decoupled such that the current may be freely chosen to control the weld penetration and weld pool without restrictions as in conventional GMAW due to the need for metal transfer. Wire feed speed, arc voltage, and laser intensity were identified three major parameters that affect the laser enhanced metal transfer process and a systematic series of experiments were designed and conducted. The behaviors of the laser enhanced metal transfer process under the effects of these parameters were analyzed using the established physics of metal transfer. Pulsed laser and/or weld current could also be utilized to better control droplet detachment. Desired heat input and current/arc pressure waveforms may thus be both delivered and controlled by GMAW through laser enhancement. Laser recoil pressure force was estimated based on the difference of gravitational force with and without laser pulse, and the result was with an acceptable accuracy. A nonlinear model based on the physical analysis of laser enhanced GMAW was established to simulate the dynamic metal transfer in this novel process, and the results agree with the experimental one.

Laser beam welding which utilizes heat as direct source is widely used in ultra high strength steel welding. Martensitic steel was selected to build vehicle body structure frame because of its excellent material characteristics in some vehicles, and laser welding was chosen as the joining process. Trailing impact rolling and intensive cooling were adopted to reduce hot cracks and improve weld property as the strength weakness in the heat affected zone was too significant. The weld zone can be controlled at the reasonable range to achieve good assembly performance to meet design requirements.

Bio

Dr. Yi Huang received his PhD Degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering (Welding Major) from the University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky in 2011, and M.S. in Materials Engineering (Welding Major) and B.S. in Welding Engineering from the State Key Laboratory for Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, China, in 2006 and 2004, respectively. His major research interests include novel welding and joining processes development for advanced materials, welding and joining metallurgy especially for microjoining, and analytical modeling of materials joining process, and dissimilar material welding and joining.

Dr. Huang is currently employed as a Staff Advanced Manufacturing Engineer at Tesla Motors, Fremont, CA. He leads Welding and Joining R&D team for exploring novel welding and joining processes for current and future vehicle models, and welding and joining processes selection and qualification, design, cost control, equipment introduction and launching for body in white, closure in white, battery enclosure, seat framing, and other structure assembly. Dr. Huang has published more than 20 papers in peer-reviewed journals and conferences. He was the recipient of the A. F. Davis Silver Medal Award for Machine Design in 2011 and Charles H. Jennings Memorial Awards in 2012 from American Welding Society (AWS), and Henry Granjon Prize for Joining and Fabrication Technology from International Institute of Welding in 2012.

Source: https://mse.osu.edu/events/2016/09/we-colloquium-yi-huang-laser-direct-and-indirect-source-welding-process

Oct
7
Fri
WE Colloquium- Michael Kirka, Oak Ridge National Laboratory @ 111 Edison Joining Technology Center
Oct 7 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

WE Colloquium: Michael Kirka, Challenges and Opportunities for Metals Additive Manufacturing

Materials Scientist, Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Friday, October 7, 2016, 2:30 pm
111 EJTC
1248 Arthur Adams Dr
Columbus, OH 43221

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) represents a significant evolution in the method by which industrially relevant components can be designed and fabricated in manners not possible by traditional techniques. While the desire is to have a push button process for the manufacture of components, there are many challenges currently facing metals additive manufacturing from metallurgical processing to structure property relationships. To be discussed is the current avenues being pursued by ORNL within the context of the electron beam melting process for qualification and certification of titanium and nickel-base superalloy AM components.

Bio

Dr. Michael KirkaDr. Michael Kirka is a Materials Scientist within the Deposition Science and Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Michael’s current research focuses on evaluating the suitability and limitations of high temperature Nickel-base (Ni-base) superalloys for additive manufacturing processes through understanding their microstructural evolution during processing in relation to their microstructure-property relationships. Additionally, Michael work on developing heat-treatments specific to Ni-base superalloy processed via additive manufacturing. Previously, Michael’s research has focused on laser based repair techniques for Ni-base superalloy gas turbine airfoils and understanding the thermomechanical material degradation mechanisms in nickel-base superalloys exposed to service like conditions. Michael received his B.S. in materials science 2007 from The University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from The Georgia Institute of Technology in mechanical engineering in 2010 and 2014 respectively.

Source: https://mse.osu.edu/events/2016/10/we-colloquium-michael-kirka-challenges-and-opportunities-metals-additive

Oct
21
Fri
WE Colloquium- Vikas Patel @ 111 Edison Joining Technology Center
Oct 21 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

WE Colloquium: Vikas Patel, Coil Joining of 3rd Generation Advance High Strength Steel

Arcelor Mittal
Friday, October 21, 2016, 2:30 pm
111 EJTC
1248 Arthur Adams Dr.
Columbus, OH 43221

Abstract

In the highly competitive automotive market along with the energy and environment concerns, the automotive manufactures are continuously looking for methods to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. This can be achieved via an effective weight reduction of vehicles by employing 3rd generation advance high strength steel (AHSS) which also improve the crash performance of the automotive body parts. Recently product development team of ArcelorMittal R&D has developed several grades of 3rd generation AHSS, which has more 2000 MPa ultimate tensile strength. Replacing the existing steel grades in automotive cars with new 3rd generation AHSS can save as much as 20 to 30 % of overall weigh of car. To produce theses grade in large scale continuous environment of steel industry, head end of the coil is to weld with tail end of other coil that being in production. This process is known as a coil joining in steel industry. Among coil joining processes, welding is a key process and its efficiency has a deep impact on productivity and throughput; speed is increased and line stops are reduced.  In continuous steel processing lines, three major welding technologies are being used: flash butt and laser welding for heavy gauge and resistance seam welding for lighter gauge. A strip break during production results in downtime of 48 to 72 hours.  Such breaks are most likely to occur at the weld because the weld has poor resistance to bending stress across it.  3rd generation AHSS products have very poor weldability. Immediately after welding, the weld zone and its surrounding area are converted into a fully martensitic structure, resulting in a very brittle weld. Application of a small bending stress across this brittle zone results in weld breaks and downtime. Standard best practice in dealing with AHSS steel is to heat treat the weld zone immediately after the welding is completed.  In spite of this, some of AHSS grades still experience brittle martensitic structure in the weld zone.  In this talk, methods to weld AHSS grade will be discussed along with the significance of coil joining in steel industry.

Bio

Dr. Vikas Patel Dr. Patel is currently a Research Engineer in the Global Research and Development Department of ArcelorMittal. He received his Bachelor in Mechanical Engineering from Veer Narmad South Gujarat University, Surat, India, in 2007; Master of Science in Industrial Technology from Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, USA, in 2009; and Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering with specialization in Material Science/Welding from Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada, in 2014. His research interest are in the field of welding and joining processes, welding metallurgy, materials characterization and additive manufacturing of metals. Dr. Patel’s Ph.D. thesis topic was “Ultrasonic Spot Welding of Lightweight Alloys.” During his Ph.D. study, Dr. Patel has published 16 refereed publications including 13 journal papers and 3 conference papers. His Ph.D. research work has been cited 244 times by other. Dr. Patel has received Distinction Award in bachelor program and Highest Standard of Academic Achievement Award in master program. Dr. Patel has been nominated for the prestigious Governor General Gold Medal Award by the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering of Ryerson University. During his PhD study, he has received a number of scholarships and awards. After finishing his Doctorate study, Dr. Patel has continue worked with Ryerson University as a Post-Doctoral Fellow for four months. After joining, ArcelorMittal Global R&D in USA, Dr. Patel has established state of the art coil joining research lab. Recently, Dr. Patel and his team members have developed a method to weld high carbon highly alloy 3rd generation advance high strength steel. Therefore, he was awarded with Research Innovation Technical Award of 2015 from ArcelorMittal Global R&D in his very first year of employment. This innovation is currently under internal review for patenting procedure. Along with research, Dr. Patel is voluntary working as a reviewer for several international journals and has reviewed more than 50 journal papers. In 2015 year, Dr. Patel got ‘Outstanding Reviewer Award’ from Materials and Design Journal.

Nov
4
Fri
WE Colloquium- Michael Kirka @ 111 EJTC
Nov 4 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

WE Colloquium: Michael Kirka, Challenges and Opportunities for Metals Additive Manufacturing

Materials Scientist, Manufacturing Demonstration Facility, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Friday, November 4, 2016, 2:30 pm
111 EJTC
1248 Arthur Adams Dr
Columbus, OH 43221

Abstract

Additive manufacturing (AM) represents a significant evolution in the method by which industrially relevant components can be designed and fabricated in manners not possible by traditional techniques. While the desire is to have a push button process for the manufacture of components, there are many challenges currently facing metals additive manufacturing from metallurgical processing to structure property relationships. To be discussed is the current avenues being pursued by ORNL within the context of the electron beam melting process for qualification and certification of titanium and nickel-base superalloy AM components.

Bio

Dr. Michael Kirka is a Materials Scientist within the Deposition Science and Technology Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Michael’s current research focuses on evaluating the suitability and limitations of high temperature Nickel-base (Ni-base) superalloys for additive manufacturing processes through understanding their microstructural evolution during processing in relation to their microstructure-property relationships. Additionally, Michael work on developing heat-treatments specific to Ni-base superalloy processed via additive manufacturing. Previously, Michael’s research has focused on laser based repair techniques for Ni-base superalloy gas turbine airfoils and understanding the thermomechanical material degradation mechanisms in nickel-base superalloys exposed to service like conditions. Michael received his B.S. in materials science 2007 from The University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from The Georgia Institute of Technology in mechanical engineering in 2010 and 2014 respectively.

Nov
14
Mon
WE Colloquium- Jun Xiao, Beijing University of Technology @ 111 EJTC
Nov 14 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

WE Colloquium: Jun Xiao, Decoupling Control of Metal Transfer in GMAW – Innovation, Theoretical Foundation, and Experimental Verification

Welding Research Inst, College of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Electronic Technology, Beijing Un of Tech
Monday, November 14, 2016, 9:30 am
111 EJTC
1248 Arthur Adams Dr
Columbus, OH 43221

Abstract

Current-independent metal transfer that droplets can be detached at relatively small diameter and any reasonable low current will provide gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process entirely new abilities to better meet needs from different applications. To this end, two separate innovations and their combination are studied and presented. So-called current-independent metal transfer is successfully realized for the first time by using pulsed high-power-density laser irradiation to partly vaporize, recoil and detach the droplet, one droplet detached by one laser pulse despite of the welding current amps. In a separate effort, an innovative current waveform is invented to actively regulate the arc force and thus excite the droplet into oscillation which can be utilized to enhance droplet detachment. Experiments and analysis provide the fundamentals and experimental verification/optimization for both the proposed methods. As a result, they can be effectively combined to form a more flexible, so-called laser-arc hybrid control method such that droplets can be detached at much reduced laser power.

Bio

Dr. Jun Xiao is an assistant Professor at the College of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Electronic Technology, Welding Research Institute at the Beijing University of Technology. His research interests include innovative welding/AM processes, sensing and control of welding processes, and robotic welding. Dr. Xiao received his PhD from the State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining at Harbin Institute of Technology. His used to spend two years at the Welding Laboratory of University of Kentucky as a joint visiting student to conduct the main research of this PhD project, during which he won the 2014 A. F. Davis Silver Medal Award Category A: Machine Design from AWS.

Source: https://mse.osu.edu/events/2016/11/we-colloquium-jun-xiao-decoupling-control-metal-transfer-gmaw-%E2%80%93-innovation

Feb
22
Wed
WE-MSE Colloquium- Sam Sham @ 111 EJTC
Feb 22 @ 9:30 am – 10:30 am

WE-MSE Joint Colloquium: Sam Sham, Down-selection and Code Qualification of Advanced Structural Material for High Temperature Reactor Applications

Technology Director, Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory
Wednesday, February 22, 2017, 9:30 am
111 Edison Joining and Technology Center (EJTC)
1248 Arthur Adams Dr
Columbus, OH 43221

This talk is a joint WE-MSE Colloquium presentation.

Please note the time and location (9:30 a.m., rm 111 EJTC) as this talk wil be held outside of the scheduled MSE/WE 7895 timeframe.

Abstract

The mission of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) of the Department of Energy is to advance nuclear power to meet the nation’s energy, environmental, and energy security needs. A variety of research and development activities in the advanced materials areas is being supported by NE to significantly improve the efficiency, safety, performance, and economics of advanced high temperature reactor systems. In addition to the operating temperature range, the selection of construction materials for an advanced reactor is critically dependent on the coolant system because of material compatibility and mass transfer issues, particularly for the lengthy design lifetime desired to reduce the annualized capital cost.

In this presentation, an overview of a multi-Laboratory effort in the down-selection of an advanced austenitic alloy for structural applications in high temperature reactor systems will be given. The requirements and challenges for the Code qualification of this advanced alloy in the nuclear section of the ASME Code in support of the design, construction and licensing of advanced high temperature reactors are discussed.

Nuclear energy is always on, produces zero carbon emission, and contributes to energy diversity. Nuclear can be part of the energy mix that provides economic and environmental benefits for the United States.

We encourage the best and the brightest graduates to join us to address these materials challenges.

Bio

Dr. Sam ShamDr. Sham is the Technology Director in the Nuclear Engineering Division at Argonne National Laboratory. His technical specialty is in deformation and failure of advanced materials and structural mechanics technologies for high temperature reactors. He is Technology Area Lead for the multi-Laboratory advanced materials R&D activities of the Office of Advanced Reactor Technologies, DOE-NE. The portfolio includes advanced alloys, graphite, and SiC/SiC composites for structural applications in high temperature thermal and fast spectrum reactors. In addition, he leads the DOE-NE international R&D efforts on advanced materials and code qualification for sodium-cooled fast reactor structural applications. He is a member of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Committee on Construction of Nuclear Facility Components (III), and BPV III Executive Committee. He chairs BPV III Subgroup on Elevated Temperature Design, which is responsible for the development and maintenance of design rules for nuclear components in elevated temperature service. He was elected ASME Fellow in 2000.

Before he joined Argonne in 2015, Dr. Sham was a Distinguished R&D Staff Member at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, held senior positions with AREVA NP Inc. and Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory, and was tenured faculty at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He holds a B.Sc. degree, First Class Honour, in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Glasgow, Scotland, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (Mechanics of Solids and Structures) as well as an M.S. (Applied Mathematics) from Brown University.

Source: https://mse.osu.edu/events/2017/02/we-mse-joint-colloquium-sam-sham