Calendar

Nov
13
Mon
2017 Russ Pitzer Lecture – J. Andrew McCammon @ 100 Stillman Hall
Nov 13 @ 4:10 pm – 5:10 pm

Lecturer: J. Andrew McCammon, University of California, San Diego

Title: Thermodynamics of Molecular Recognition

Light reception to follow in CBEC lobby

 

J. Andrew McCammon is the Joseph E. Mayer Chair Professor of Theoretical Chemistry and Distinguished Professor of Pharmacology at UCSD.   He received his B.A. from Pomona College, and his Ph.D. in chemical physics from Harvard University, where he worked with John Deutch (of MIT).  In 1976-78, he developed the computer simulation approach to protein dynamics in Martin Karplus’s lab at Harvard.  He joined the University of Houston as Assistant Professor of Chemistry in 1978, and became the M.D. Anderson Chair Professor of Chemistry in 1981. He moved to UCSD in 1995.  Professor McCammon has invented theoretical methods for accurately predicting and interpreting molecular recognition, rates of reactions, and other properties of chemical systems.  In addition to their fundamental interest, these methods play a growing role in the design of new drugs and other materials.  Professor McCammon is the author with Stephen Harvey of “Dynamics of Proteins and Nucleic Acids” (Cambridge University Press), and is the author or co-author of more than 800 publications in theoretical chemistry and biochemistry. More than 80 of his graduate students and postdoctoral fellows have secured tenured or tenure-track faculty positions at leading colleges and universities.  In the 1980’s, Professor McCammon guided the establishment of the computer-aided drug discovery program of Agouron Pharmaceuticals (now Pfizer Global Research and Development, La Jolla Laboratories), and contributed to the development of the widely prescribed HIV-1 protease inhibitor, Viracept (nelfinavir).  The McCammon group’s studies of HIV-1 integrase flexibility contributed to the discovery of the first in a new class of antiviral drugs by Merck & Co., named Isentress (raltegravir) and approved by the US FDA in 2007. Professor McCammon received the first George Herbert Hitchings Award for Innovative Methods in Drug Design from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund in 1987.  In 1995, he received the Smithsonian Institution’s Information Technology Leadership Award for Breakthrough Computational Science, sponsored by Cray Research.  He is the recipient of the American Chemical Society’s 2008 National Award for Computers in Chemical and Pharmaceutical Research.  He received the Joseph O. Hirschfelder Prize in Theoretical Chemistry for 2016-17 and the Russell M. Pitzer Award in Theoretical Chemistry in 2017. Professor McCammon is a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, and the Biophysical Society.  He is a Member of the US National Academy of Sciences.

 

Nov
14
Tue
Faculty Seminar – Dr. David Nagib @ 100 Stillman Hall
Nov 14 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Speaker: Dr. Daivid Nagib

Title: Radical Chaperones

CAR Seminar Series: Polina Brodsky @ 198 Center for Automotive Research
Nov 14 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm

Host: Marcello Canova

Speaker: Polina Brodsky

Title: Effects of overcharging and fast-charging on Li-ion cell performance and safety: preliminary investigation

Nov
15
Wed
Panel Discussion: 2018 OSU Materials Research Seed Grant Program @ 4138 Physics Research Building
Nov 15 @ 4:15 pm – 5:15 pm

We are pleased to announce the 2018 OSU Materials Research Seed Grant Program Request for Proposals (RFP), which is open to The Ohio State University (OSU) materials community.  This enhanced seed program leverages resources and best practices of the Center for Emergent Materials (CEM), the Center for Exploration of Novel Complex Materials (ENCOMM), and the Institute for Materials Research (IMR).  The result is a unified RFP with Funding Tiers designed to achieve the greatest impact for seeding excellence in materials research of varying scopes, and with the goal of generating new directions that extend beyond the boundaries of existing research programs.

2018 Materials Research Seed Grant Program RFP

Deadlines

  • Letters of Intent: December 4th, 2017 at 5pm
  • Seed Grant Program Panel Discussion: Wednesday, November 15, 2017 (4:15 – 5:15 PM, room 4138 Physics Research Building)
  • Proto-IRG and MTBG Team Mandatory Presentations: January 17, 24, 31, 2018
  • Proposals: March 19, 2018 at 5pm

More information on the seed program here.

Nov
16
Thu
BME Seminar Series: Dr. Rebecca Hiese @ 245 Bevis Hall
Nov 16 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Speaker: Dr. Rebecca Hiese, Assistant Professor

Affiliation: Virginia Commonwealth University

Title: Details coming soon

Devon Walter Meek Lecture – Dennis C. Liotta @ CBEC 130
Nov 16 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Lecturer: Dennis C. Liotta

Affiliation: Emory University

 

Reception to follow in CBEC Lobby including an Undergraduate Poster Session and a Dow Graduate Student Poster Session.

 

Over the past two and a half decades Dr. Dennis Liotta’s research has focused on the discovery and development of novel antiviral, anticancer and anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents. He is recognized as one of the premier discoverers of novel therapeutics, having been one of the inventors associated with ten FDA approved therapeutics including Epivir, Combivir, Trizivir, Epzicom, Epivir-HBV, Emtriva, Truvada, Atripla, Complera and Stribid. In addition, he is the inventor of record for several clinically important antivirals, including Epivir, Reverset, Racivir and Elvucitabine. He is also the lead inventor of Q-122 (formerly known as MSX-122), a safe, orally available clinical agent for controlling hot flashes in post-menopausal women. In the preclinical arena his research group has recently discovered the first potent, dual tropic (CCR5/CXCR4) HIV entry inhibitor. In addition, in his current role as Executive Director of the Emory Institute for Drug Development, Dr. Liotta oversaw the discovery and development of a novel nucleoside analogue, EIDD-2023, for treating hepatitis C infections.

 

Dr. Liotta has authored over 250 peer reviewed publications and is an inventor on over 75 issued US patents. A company he founded, Pharmasset (acquired by Gilead Sciences) developed Sofosbuvir, which has become the first line therapy for treating (and perhaps curing) hepatitis C. In addition, he has founded numerous other companies including, inter alia: (a) Altiris (drugs for stem cell mobilization and as potential treatments for a variety of cancers); (b) Triangle Pharmaceuticals (developed emtricitabine and was subsequently acquired by Gilead Sciences); (c) NeurOp (therapies for treating ischemic conditions, such as stroke); (d) QUE Oncology, a joint venture owned by the University of Queensland and Emory, that is carrying out the Q-122 clinical trials (vide supra); and (e) DRIVE (Drug Innovation Ventures at Emory, a non-profit drug development company focused on the development of therapies for treating single stranded RNA virus infections, such as Dengue Fever, hepatitis C, influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus and various equine encephalitis viruses). DRIVE utilizes an innovative model that seeks to extract maximum value from therapeutic innovations discovered at Emory or elsewhere by efficiently advancing them into clinical trials.

Nov
17
Fri
Distinguished Guest Speaker: Dr. Lyle Ungar @ 480 Dreese Labs
Nov 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania

Title: Measuring Psychological Traits using Social Media

Host: Wei Xu

 

Abstract:

The words and images people post on social media such as Twitter and Facebook provide a rich, if imperfect, view of who they are and what they care about.  We analyze tens of millions of Facebook posts and tens of billions of tweets to study variation in language use with age, gender, personality, and mental and physical well-being.  Word clouds visually illustrate the big five personality traits (e.g., “What is it like to be neurotic?”), while correlations between language use and county-level health data suggest connections between health and happiness, including potential psychological causes of heart disease.  Similar analyses are increasingly being used for applications ranging from job candidate screening to targeted marketing.

 

Bio:

Dr. Lyle Ungar is a Professor of Computer and Information Science at the University of Pennsylvania, where he also holds appointments in multiple departments in the Schools of Business, Medicine, Arts and Sciences, and Engineering and Applied Science.  Lyle received a B.S. from Stanford University and a Ph.D. from M.I.T.  He has published over 250 articles, supervised two dozen PhD students, and is co-inventor on ten patents.  His current research focuses on developing scalable machine learning methods for data mining and text mining, including deep learning methods for NLP, and analysis of social media to better understand the drivers of physical and mental well-being.

MAE Seminar: Dr. Robert M. Nerem @ E001 Scott Lab
Nov 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Affiliation: Georgia Tech

Hosted by: Professor Vish Subramaniam

Title: Engineering and the Life Sciences: From Benchtop Research to Biomanufacturing


MAE alumnus Dr. Robert M. Nerem (’61 MS, ’64 PhD, Aerospace Engineering) is an institute professor emeritus and founding director at the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience at Georgia Tech.

 

During his “Engineering and Life Sciences” seminar on Nov. 17, Dr. Nerem will discuss his academic journey, including his early work exploring shock tube research and his transition to focusing on biomedical research. His work has ranged from understanding the role of hemodynamics in atherosclerosis to advancing tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, including stem cell technology.

 

Cell-based therapies and how to translate benchtop cell-based research into cell therapy treatments for patients are two critical areas of focus for Dr. Nerem. His expertise in this field has resulted in the establishment of a major initiative at Georgia Tech, which focuses on the characterization of therapeutic cells and the manufacturing of those cells.

 

In 1994, Dr. Neremwas quoted as saying “biology is too important to be left to the biologists.” Today, it is widely recognized that the “convergence” of disciplines will lead to a deeper understanding of biology. By combining engineering and the life sciences, researchers will have the skills needed to develop life-changing advances in the treatment of diseases that impact millions of individuals around the globe.

 

Bio:

Dr. Robert M. Nerem, an alumnus of Ohio State’s Aerospace Engineering Program, joined Georgia Tech as the Parker H. Petit Distinguished Chair for Engineering in Medicine in 1987. He was the founding director of the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and he served as director of the Georgia Tech/Emory Center for the Engineering of Living Tissues, a National Science Foundation-funded Engineering Research Center.

 

MSE Colloquium: Mariana Bertoni @ 264 MacQuigg Laboratory
Nov 17 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Affiliation: School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University

Title: Across Dimensions and Scales: Correlative Imaging and Data Analytics to Design Next-Generation Solar Absorbers

 

Abstract:

Integrating and synthesizing correlative information is something our brain performs seamlessly every second of the day from information gathered by our senses from our “operating” environment.  In the field of energy conversion technology the confluence of state-of-the-art characterization approaches and advanced computing will enable us to emulate this highly efficient process at unimaginable speeds, thus allowing us to design next generation materials and devices.

High conversion efficiency and long device lifetimes requires exercising nanoscale control over the material’s microstructure and composition as well as transport across device interfaces throughout multiple length scales. For decades we have focused on pushing technique’s resolution close to the physical limits, almost to the point where it has become commoditized. While high resolution is necessary to develop emerging energy materials, multimodality sensing and functionality are univocally more valuable. This presentation will cover recent results in the polycrystalline CuInGaSe2 system and show that the key lies in the multimodal evaluation of the device under operating conditions and the kinetics that govern compositional inhomogeneities.

 

Bio:

Professor Bertoni received her PhD from Northwestern University in 2007 in Materials Science and Engineering with a minor in Chemistry. She joined ASU as an Assistant Professor in 2012. Prior to this, she held senior scientist positions at two emerging start-up firms in the photovoltaic industry and a visiting scientist appointment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2010-2012). Her previous postgraduate experience includes a postdoctoral appointment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2008-2010), a Marie Curie postdoctoral fellowship at Creavis Technologies & Innovation in Germany (2007-2008) and a visiting researcher appointment at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. She has published over 60 research articles in peer-reviewed journals, and presented more than 120 papers at scientific meetings. She has received multiple awards and recognitions, including most recently selection to the National Academy of Engineering 2017 US Frontiers of Engineering and ASU’s 2016 Outstanding Assistant Professor.  She currently serves at the Advanced Photon Source MBA upgrade user board and is active in various committees and chairing positions at the IEEE photovoltaic specialists conferences.

Devon Walter Meek Lecture – Dennis C. Liotta @ CBEC 130
Nov 17 @ 4:10 pm – 5:30 pm

Lecturer: Dennis C. Liotta

Affiliation: Emory University

 

Reception to follow in CBEC Lobby including an Undergraduate Poster Session and a Dow Graduate Student Poster Session.

 

Over the past two and a half decades Dr. Dennis Liotta’s research has focused on the discovery and development of novel antiviral, anticancer and anti-inflammatory therapeutic agents. He is recognized as one of the premier discoverers of novel therapeutics, having been one of the inventors associated with ten FDA approved therapeutics including Epivir, Combivir, Trizivir, Epzicom, Epivir-HBV, Emtriva, Truvada, Atripla, Complera and Stribid. In addition, he is the inventor of record for several clinically important antivirals, including Epivir, Reverset, Racivir and Elvucitabine. He is also the lead inventor of Q-122 (formerly known as MSX-122), a safe, orally available clinical agent for controlling hot flashes in post-menopausal women. In the preclinical arena his research group has recently discovered the first potent, dual tropic (CCR5/CXCR4) HIV entry inhibitor. In addition, in his current role as Executive Director of the Emory Institute for Drug Development, Dr. Liotta oversaw the discovery and development of a novel nucleoside analogue, EIDD-2023, for treating hepatitis C infections.

 

Dr. Liotta has authored over 250 peer reviewed publications and is an inventor on over 75 issued US patents. A company he founded, Pharmasset (acquired by Gilead Sciences) developed Sofosbuvir, which has become the first line therapy for treating (and perhaps curing) hepatitis C. In addition, he has founded numerous other companies including, inter alia: (a) Altiris (drugs for stem cell mobilization and as potential treatments for a variety of cancers); (b) Triangle Pharmaceuticals (developed emtricitabine and was subsequently acquired by Gilead Sciences); (c) NeurOp (therapies for treating ischemic conditions, such as stroke); (d) QUE Oncology, a joint venture owned by the University of Queensland and Emory, that is carrying out the Q-122 clinical trials (vide supra); and (e) DRIVE (Drug Innovation Ventures at Emory, a non-profit drug development company focused on the development of therapies for treating single stranded RNA virus infections, such as Dengue Fever, hepatitis C, influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus and various equine encephalitis viruses). DRIVE utilizes an innovative model that seeks to extract maximum value from therapeutic innovations discovered at Emory or elsewhere by efficiently advancing them into clinical trials.