Calendar

Jun
27
Tue
ECE Distinguished Seminar Series – Jesus del Alamo, MIT @ Webinar
Jun 27 @ 4:45 pm – 5:45 pm

Webinar: Nanometer Scale III-V CMOS, sponsored by the IEEE EDS/Photonics Chapter Distinguished Lecturer Program

Abstract:

In the last few years, as Si electronics faces mounting difficulties to maintain its historical scaling path, transistors based on III-V compound semiconductors have emerged as a credible alternative. To get to this point, fundamental technical problems had to be solved though there are still many chal-lenges that need to be addressed before the first non-Si CMOS technology becomes a reality.  Among them, harnessing the out-standing electron transport properties of InGaAs, the leading n-channel material candidate, towards a high-performance na-noscale MOSFET has proven difficult; contact resistance, offstate characteristics, reliability and Si integration remain serious problems. Introducing a new material system is not the only challenge. Scalability to sub-10 nm gate dimensions also demands a new 3D transistor geometry. InGaAs FinFETs, Trigate MOSFETs and Nanowire MOSFETs have all been demonstrated but their performance is still disappointing.  To compound the challenge, a high-performance nanoscale p-type transistor is also re-quired.  Among III-Vs, InGaSb is the most promising candidate. Planar MOSFETs have been demonstrated but more advanced geometries remain elusive.  This talk will review recent progress as well as challenges confronting III-V electronics for future CMOS logic applications.

Bio:

Jesús del Alamo is Director of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories, Donner Professor, and Professor of Electrical Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. He holds degrees from Polytechnic University of Madrid (Telecommunications Engineer, 1980), and Stanford University (MS EE, 1983 and PhD EE, 1985). From 1977 to 1981 he was with the Institute of Solar Energy of the Polytechnic University of Madrid, investigating silicon photovoltaics. From 1981 to 1985, he carried out his PhD dissertation at Stanford University on minority car-rier transport in heavily doped silicon. From 1985 to 1988 he was research engineer with NTT LSI Laboratories in Atsugi (Japan) where he conducted research on III-V heterostructure field-effect transistors. He joined MIT in 1988.  From 1991 to 1996, Prof. del Alamo was an National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator. In 1999 he was elected a corresponding member of the Royal Spanish Academy of Engineering. In 2005, he was elected a Fellow of the IEEE and in 2014 he was elected a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Among other activities, Prof. del Alamo was Editor of IEEE Electron Device Letters from 2005 to 2014 and since 2013 he is the Director of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories at MIT.

Event hosted by: ECE Professor, Paul Berger

Jul
19
Wed
MSE Seminar – Brandon Giles @ 184 Watts Hall
Jul 19 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Title: TBA

Advisor: Dr. Roberto Myers

Sep
1
Fri
Seminar: Designing Surfaces with Extreme Wettabilities – Dr. Anish Tuteja @ E100 Scott Lab
Sep 1 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Affiliation: University of Michigan

Hosted By: Professor Bharat Bhushan

Description: In this talk I will discuss the current work in my group on developing surfaces with extreme wettabilities, i.e. surfaces that are either completely wet by, or completely repel, different liquids. The first portion of the talk will cover the design of so called “superomniphobic surfaces” i.e. surfaces which repel all liquids. Designing and producing textured surfaces that can resist wetting by low surface tension liquids such as various oils or alcohols has been a significant challenge in materials science, and no examples of such surfaces exist in nature. As part of this work, I explain how re-entrant surface curvature, in addition to surface chemistry and roughness, can be used to design surfaces that cause virtually all liquids, including oils, alcohols, water, concentrated organic and inorganic acids, bases, solvents, as well as, viscoelastic polymer solutions to roll-off and bounce.

The second portion of my talk will cover the design of the first-ever reconfigurable membranes that, counter-intuitively, are both superhydrophilic (i.e., water contact angles @ 0°) and superoleophobic (i.e., oil contact angles > 150°). This makes these porous surfaces ideal for gravity-based separation of oil and water as they allow the higher density liquid (water) to flow through while retaining the lower density liquid (oil).  These fouling-resistant membranes can separate, for the first time, a range of different oil–water mixtures, including emulsions, in a single-unit operation, with >99.9% separation efficiency, by using the difference in capillary forces acting on the oil and water phases. As the separation methodology is solely gravity-driven, it is expected to be one of the most energy-efficient technologies for oil-water separation.

I will also discuss surfaces with patterned wettability, where both wetting (omniphilic) and non-wetting (omniphobic) domains are fabricated on the same substrate. We use such substrates for fabricating monodisperse, multi-phasic, micro- and nano-particles possessing virtually any desired composition, projected shape, modulus, and dimensions as small as 25 nm. Finally, I will discuss some other areas of current and future research, including the development of ice-phobic coatings that offer one of the lowest reported adhesion strengths with ice.

Sep
13
Wed
Research Networking Series- Promoting Health and Wellness @ STEAM Factory
Sep 13 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Research, Short and Sweet
If you only had one minute and one slide to explain your work, what would you say? Please join your research colleagues for a new quarterly networking series that connects the most collaborative minds engaged in Discovery at Ohio State.
Light refreshments will be provided.
Registration is limited to the first 40 registrants for each session.
To register for a future session (dates and details below), send pdf slide & desired session to Spellacy.16@osu.edu.
Direct questions about presentations to Brenner.17@osu.edu.
Oct
2
Mon
Seminar: Eric Ruggiero @ E100 Scott Lab
Oct 2 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Affiliation: GE Aviation, Cincinnati, OH

Hosted by: Professor Marcelo Dapino

Oct
9
Mon
Analytical/Physical Seminar – Dr. Thorsten Bernhardt @ 2004 Evans Laboratory
Oct 9 @ 4:10 pm – 5:10 pm

Title: TBA

Affiliation: Ulm University

Hosted by: Dr. Zhong

Oct
16
Mon
Analytical/Physical Seminar – Dr. Thomas Rizzo @ 2004 Evans Laboratory
Oct 16 @ 4:10 pm – 5:10 pm

Title: TBA

Affiliation: Encole Polytechnique de Fédérale de Lausanne

Hosted by: Dr. Wysocki

Oct
23
Mon
Analytical/Physical Seminar – Dr. Chad Rienstra @ 2004 Evans Laboratory
Oct 23 @ 4:10 pm – 5:10 pm

Title: TBA

Affiliation: University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

Hosted by: Dr. Jaroniec

Oct
24
Tue
Organic and Inorganic Seminar Series – Dr. Jeremiah Gassensmith @ 2004 Evans Laboratory
Oct 24 @ 11:30 am – 12:30 pm

Title: TBA

Affiliation: University of Texas, Dallas

Hosted by: Dr. McGrier

Oct
31
Tue
Seminar: Nature’s Multiscale Design Strategies and Additive Manufacturing – Dr. Xiaodong (Chris) Li @ E100 Scott Lab
Oct 31 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Affiliation: University of Virginia

Hosted by: Professor Bharat Bhushan

Description: 

Recent discoveries in seashells unveil that nature uses multiscale design strategies to achieve exceptional mechanical properties which are still beyond the reach of many engineering materials. The multiscale hierarchical structure, ranging from micro lamellae down to nanoparticles, renders seashells multilevel strengthening and toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, interlocking, lamellae’s deformability, biopolymer’s viscosity, nanoparticle rotation, deformation twining in nanoparticles, and amorphization, jointly contributing to seashell’s ultra-high mechanical robustness. To realize nature’s performance in engineering materials, we need to intelligently design and select materials. This talk will present several case studies in which nature’s multiscale design strategies and materials selection principles are applied through additive manufacturing.

About the Speaker

Xiaodong (Chris) Li is a Rolls-Royce Commonwealth Professor and the graduate director in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia. He is an ASME Fellow and a SEM Fellow. His research expertise and interests include (but not limited to) biological and bio-inspired materials, biomechanics, biomass-derived energy storage, nanomechanics, surface engineering, and tribology. He has published over 230 peer-reviewed journal articles including Science, Nature Communications, Advanced Materials, Nano Letters, Physical Review Letters, Acta Materialia, Acta Biomaterialia, Physical Review B, and Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids. His publications have been cited over 10,580 times with H-index of 50. He has received several awards including the TMS MPMD Distinguished Scientist/Engineer Award (2015) and the Professional Engineering Publisher´s PE Prize (2008). His breakthrough work has been featured by Science Daily, Discovery News, BBC, and MSNBC. His innovation was selected by New York Times – Year in Ideas for Year 2010. He is an associate editor for Transactions of the ASME – Applied Mechanics Reviews and serves on editorial board for ten journals. He was the elected chair for TMS nanomechanical materials behavior committee.