2017 OSU Materials Week – Thursday Recap

2017 OSU Materials Week continued Thursday with a full day of technical sessions followed by our second student poster session.  The morning’s Cross Cutting Session featured four faculty recently hired through IMR’s Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) program.  The technical program continued in the afternoon with Focus Sessions on Integrated Design of Materials and Innovations in Advanced Microscopy. The second student poster sessions took place tonight, with over 50 Ohio State students presenting their research.

  

 

The conference continues tomorrow, with two Focus Sessions on Nanoengineered Materials for Medical Applications and Wide Bandgap Semiconductors from 9AM – 12:45, followed by our closing and pizza lunch, where a variety of awards will be given including student poster awards and the winners of the Three Minute Thesis competition.

The full agenda is available online. On-site registration is available.

 

2017 OSU Materials Week is hosted by the Institute for Materials Research and its Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) program. We are grateful for generous support from the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) and the Office of Energy and Environment.

2017 OSU Materials Week – Wednesday Recap

Wednesday was the first full day of the 2017 OSU Materials Week conference.  The morning’s Cross Cutting Session featured five faculty recently hired through IMR’s Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) program.  The technical program continued in the afternoon with Focus Sessions on Materials Innovation and Materials and Nanostructures for Magnetic Skyrmions. The first of two student poster sessions took place tonight, with over 50 Ohio State students presenting their research.

 

     

The conference continues tomorrow, with the additional four new M&MS faculty presenting at Thursday’s Cross Cutting session, beginning at 9AM; Focus Sessions on Integrated Design of Materials and Innovations in Advanced Microscopy from 1-5PM, and our second student poster session from 5-7PM.

 

Materials Week continues through Friday. The full agenda is available online. On-site registration is available.

 

 

2017 OSU Materials Week is hosted by the Institute for Materials Research and its Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) program. We are grateful for generous support from the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) and the Office of Energy and Environment.

2017 OSU Materials Week – Tuesday Recap

Ohio State’s Senior Vice President for Research Caroline Whitacre opens Materials Week’s welcome event

2017 OSU Materials Week had a great start Tuesday afternoon, with a full schedule of activities geared to our materials community. Our welcome event began with introductions by IMR Executive Director Steve Ringel and Senior Vice President for Research Caroline Whitacre. IMR staff then surprised Dr. Ringel with a video looking back over IMR’s first ten years and its future directions.

 

 

Keynote speaker Ayodhya Tiwari with a sample of Flisom’s flexible solar cells

The IMR Keynote Address, “Solar Electricity: Advancements and Opportunities with Innovative Emerging Technologies” was given by Ayodhya Tiwari, Head of the Laboratory for Thin Films and Photovoltaics at Empa – Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology and Professor at ETH Zurich.  Tiwari is also the founder and Chairman of Flisom Ltd., a company he created with his doctoral students after achieving world record efficiency in photovoltaic devices developed in his research lab.  Tiwari’s address reviewed the need for efficient yet affordable solar energy systems and the challenges in design and functionality of solar cells, and he demonstrated the flexible solar modules produced by Flisom today.

 

 

Six Ohio State Masters and PhD student finalists took part in the Three Minute Thesis competition Tuesday afternoon.

After a brief welcome reception, the crowd reconvened to attend the finals of the Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) competition, where six Masters and PhD students were challenged to explain their research in less than three minutes to a general audience. The 3MT® competition is new to Materials Week, and gives graduate students the opportunity to practice the important skill of communicating their scientific work to a non-technical audience. The four judges were marketing and communications professionals from throughout the university, and the 3MT® winners will be announced at our Materials Week closing and poster awards session at 12:45 on Friday.

 

 

Materials Week continues through Friday. The full agenda is available online. On-site registration is available.

 

 

2017 OSU Materials Week is hosted by the Institute for Materials Research and its Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) program. We are grateful for generous support from the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) and the Office of Energy and Environment.

Using Food Waste as a Sustainable Rubber Filler

Katrina Cornish, Ohio Research Scholar and Professor of Horticulture and Crop Sciences and Food, Agriculture and Biological Engineering, Cornish’s lab at Ohio State’s Wooster campus designs natural rubber alternatives using crops of guayule and Buckeye Gold dandelion, combined with eggshells and tomato peels.

Cornish Barrera

Professor Katrina Cornish with Postdoctoral Researcher Cindy Barrera in the group’s research facility

Through the Program of Excellence in Natural Rubber Alternatives (PENRA) research facility, Cornish’s research group found that partially replacing carbon black with ground eggshells or tomato peels in rubber enhanced its overall strength, elasticity and softness. Both materials offer practical advantages in tire manufacture. Tomato skins offer high-temperature stability, while the porousness of eggshells enable it to bond well with rubber. Additional testing led the researchers to widen their applications of these alternatives beyond tires to other rubber products such as gaskets, hoses and rubber gloves.

Researchers from The Ohio State University have developed a patent-pending, greener—or, more accurately, reddish-brown—alternative to the carbon black filler used in tires.

Natural rubber is a vital resource for any developed country and is used in over 40,000 commercial products. By 2020 the USA may suffer a supply shortfall of 1.5 million metric tons of imported natural rubber. While the use of synthetic rubber has surpassed natural rubber in quantity, there are particular properties and high-performance applications that make natural rubber irreplaceable by synthetic rubber.

As carbon black supply dwindles, eggshells and tomato skins abound. America alone consumes almost 100 billion eggs and 13 million tons of tomatoes annually, with their shells and skins going to landfills. Cornish expects the food factories that dispose of these items to become the go-to source for new filler material.

Cornish explains that the technology has the potential to address three problems: allow more sustainable tire manufacturing process, reduce the tire industry’s dependence on foreign oil, and keep waste out of landfills.


Cornish’s research has been covered by several national media this month, which served as sources for this article:

Wall Street Journal: https://www.wsj.com/articles/making-tire-filler-from-eggshells-1489093113

US News & World Report: https://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2017-03-09/incorporating-food-waste-into-tires-may-sustain-industry-long-term

How Stuff Works: http://now.howstuffworks.com/2017/03/10/food-waste-wheels-researchers-turn-tomatoes-tires

Yahoo! News: https://sg.news.yahoo.com/tires-made-eggshells-tomato-skins-081804297.html

Innovations in Materials Research Newsletter – Winter 2017 Issue

The Winter 2017 issue of Innovations in Materials Research, the biannual newsletter of the OSU Institute for Materials Research, is now available online!

Winter 2017 newsletter cover

The latest issue of our biannual newsletter is now available online and in print. Features include stories about two student design challenges IMR has coordinated, two new Global Partnership Grants supporting OSU-India partnerships, advances in energy research that began at our SEAL facility, and four new faces at IMR who are helping us grow and expand our programs and impact in materials research.

 

Features

  • Global Partnership Grants Fund Ohio State/IIT Bombay Research Collaborations
  • Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) Discovery Theme Updates: Materials Innovation Lab Design Challenge, ENGR 2367 Experiential Learning Model Includes Industry Partnerships
  • Research Highlight: Innovative Energy Research Advances Have Origins at SEAL
  • New Faces at IMR Helping Build Its Future
  • Ohio State’s Newest Materials Lab: CCIC-NMR Facility
  • 2016 OSU Materials Week Recap

 

With regular updates from:

  • Center for Emergent Materials (CEM), Ohio State’s NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC)
  • Core campus materials facilities
  • IMR Member News

 

Download the Winter 2017 Innovations in Materials Research

 


About Innovations in Materials Research

Innovations in Materials Research is IMR’s biannual newsletter (formerly IMR Quarterly) featuring technical articles highlighting OSU research, updates on research funded by IMR grants, facility updates, recently awarded grants, and other materials research news.

To receive the newsletter by mail or to make suggestions for future articles please contact Layla Manganaro at manganaro.4@osu.edu.