Air Force Research Laboratory looks to Ohio State for materials innovation

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and The Ohio State University’s Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis (CEMAS) have established a long-term research collaboration platform for advanced materials characterization.

 

The Air Force Research Laboratory’s Materials and Manufacturing Directorate (AFRL/RX) develops materials, processes, and advanced manufacturing technologies for aircraft, spacecraft, missiles, rockets, and ground-based systems and their structural, electronic and optical components. Precision is critical in these endeavors, and CEMAS equipment and expertise will be leveraged to achieve optimal results.

 

A five-year $4.25 million grant will fund a cohort of post-doctoral research fellows (PDRFs) focused on precision measurement tools for advanced functional and structural materials characterization. Material classes of interest include metals, semiconductors, ceramics, polymers, composites, functionally graded materials, nanomaterials, electronics, sensors and biological materials.

 

The PDRFs will be embedded in the research groups at AFRL/RX offices at Wright-Patterson AFB and will have a faculty advisor at CEMAS to ensure access to the latest developments and capabilities.

 

“These outstanding young researchers will be the conduit between our two research enterprises,” said CEMAS Director David McComb. “There they will learn the materials and advanced manufacturing challenges that impede AFRL’s progress. Here they will have access to state-of-the-art microscopy equipment and the nation’s leading experts in materials characterization to help solve those challenges and innovate to improve our national defense.”

 

Read more about the CEMAS-AFRL collaboration at the College of Engineering site.

 

Defense funding to enhance Engineering research capabilities

Probe-corrected Titan3™ 80-300 S/TEM

Materials Science and Engineering Professor David McComb and Electrical and Computer Engineering Professor Paul Berger earned federal grants for laboratory equipment useful in advancing national defense research.

 

The Department of Defense (DoD) recently announced awards to 175 university researchers at 91 institutions in 36 states, totaling $53 million through the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP). The program augments capabilities at universities conducting cutting edge research for DoD, through the procurement of state-of-the-art equipment.

 

Institute for Materials Research (IMR) associate director David McComb’s $1.425 million DURIP award will enable the upgrade of a probe-corrected Titan scanning transmission electron microscope.

 

McComb, director of the Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis, said the instrument will be utilized in existing and new projects with colleagues in several DoD facilities, and the technology facilitates collaboration, training and education because it can be controlled remotely.

 

Berger, also an IMR member, earned a $125,000 DURIP award to secure equipment, including a 110 GHz spectrum analyzer, which can perform high frequency and switching measurements of gallium nitride structures.

 

“DURIP instrumentation awards provide the unique means through which DoD supports universities in the acquisition of essential laboratory equipment, usually out of reach for most research grants,” said Dale Ormond, principal director for research.

 

Read more about the awards at the College of Engineering site.

 

 

Defense-funded research will advance electronic materials, additive manufacturing

Engineering faculty representing several disciplines soon will receive Department of Defense (DoD) funding to accelerate important research and training of graduate students. The Ohio State College of Engineering research teams have received two of the 24 Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) awards recently announced.

 

Neal A. Smith Endowed Chair Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering Steven A. Ringel, Electrical and Computer Engineering Associate Professors Siddharth Rajan and Hongping Zhao, and Materials Science and Engineering Assistant Professor Jinwoo Hwang are co-investigators of a MURI project led by James Speck at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the “Gallium Oxide Materials Science and Engineering – GAME” project will study the promising wide bandgap semiconductor material’s structure-property relationships and advance the material to new-generation electronic and photonic device applications. The Ohio State investigators will share approximately $3.7 million of the total awarded amount ($7.5 million) over the next five years.

 

Project-related atomic resolution microscopy will occur at Ohio State’s Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis (CEMAS), with primary materials growth and device development occurring at Ohio State’s Semiconductor Epitaxy and Analysis Lab (SEAL) and the Nanotech West Laboratory.

 

Ringel also is the Executive Director of Ohio State’s Institute for Materials Research (IMR), and holds courtesy professor appointments in the Departments of Physics and Materials Science and Engineering. Rajan holds a co-appointment in Materials Science and Engineering. Investigators from Cornell University and Georgia Tech round out the team. Collectively, project members have published nearly 50 journal papers on gallium oxide to date.

 

Materials Science and Engineering Professor Joerg Jinschek is collaborating on a separate advanced manufacturing MURI project led by the University of Tennessee’s Suresh Babu. This multidisciplinary team—which also includes Virginia Tech, Iowa State University, the University of California, Santa Barbara and the Colorado School of Mines—will focus on properties, defects and instabilities in additive manufactured alloys, an area of great importance to the Office of Naval Research. They will analyze a number of physical processes that can affect the final product, including rapid heating and cooling, and examine how physical properties at the submicron level might differ from those at a far greater scale.

 

Also utilizing CEMAS capabilities, Jinschek will lead in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) efforts to track dynamics of phase transformations and defect evolution on the nanometer length scale. Ohio State’s share of the funding over five years could total up to $1.25 million. The co-investigator from Iowa State, associate professor Peter Collins, is an Ohio State alumnus.

 

The highly competitive MURI program complements other DoD basic research initiatives that support traditional, three-year, single-investigator university research grants. By supporting multidisciplinary teams with larger, longer awards in carefully chosen and relevant research topics, DoD and the Services enhance the potential for significant and sustained advancement of research in critical areas of importance to National Security and the DoD’s mission.

 

The Army Research Office, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Office of Naval Research solicited proposals in 24 topic areas important to the DoD and the Services.  In response to the initial solicitation the department received 436 white papers.

 

This article was originally published on the College of Engineering site, found here.

 

Krishna Wins ONR Grant to Develop Next-Gen IR Detector Technologies

ECE team wins $3 million ONR grant to make infrared detector technologies at Ohio State tops

The research team consists of (l-r) Teressa Specht, SeungHyun Lee, Vinita Dahiya, Gustavo Vieira and Krishna. Alireza Kazemi (not pictured).

 

Landing planes in zero visibility. Detecting pollution at the nanoscale.

A potential $3 million in new grant funding could help make The Ohio State University a worldwide leader in next-generation infrared detector technologies.

Electrical and computer engineering (ECE) professor Sanjay Krishna had only been at Ohio State a month, hired as part of the university’s Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) Discovery Themes initiative, before landing the grant from the Office of Naval Research (ONR).

“This means great things for Ohio State’s Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability Discovery Theme initiative,” Ohio State professor Steve Ringel said, who leads the M&MS program to create pre-eminence in materials and technologies for sustainability, focusing on innovation and industry deployment.

“Sanjay is the epitome of what M&MS is all about,” Ringel said. “Not only is he a world leader in critical areas of science and technology that impact energy and the environment who, through awards such as this, is already enhancing our prominence academically, but he is also dedicated to the translation of those successes into the private sector through his innovative activities as an entrepreneur.”

The new grant funding comes on behalf of the High Energy Laser Joint Technology Office (HEL-JTO) Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) Program, under the Secretary of Defense for Science and Technology, (DUSDS&T).

It is an alphabet soup of acronyms, for sure, but Krishna said the intention of the grant award is simple – to explore new realms of infrared camera technologies and set the stage for more advancements decades down the line.

Krishna is a world-leading researcher and innovator in the field of narrow bandgap semiconductors applied to infrared imaging sensors and related technologies.

“I want to make Ohio State the number one research group in this particular area,” Krishna said.

His winning research proposal, “Low Excess-noise Avalanche Photodetectors with Superlattices (LEAPS),” outlines research and development toward high performance short wavelength infrared detectors based on III-V semiconductors designed for manufacturing.

“Infrared detectors are important because they can be used for chemical sensing,” Krishna said. “If you want to find out what is coming out of a factory, or what pollution is coming out of a car. Usually these hydrocarbons have characteristics of nature in the infrared. So, if you send a laser beam and watch it come back, you can see that it’s nitrogen oxide or carbon dioxide, or even methane.”

He said infrared detectors can enhance the ability to see through objects.

“If you are landing a plane in wet and foggy conditions, you can see. If a firefighter or first responder is entering a building, you can see in the infrared beyond what you can see in the visible,” Krishna said.

Infrared technology can also study how heat dissipates from the human body.

“We are currently emitting photons,” he said. “You can use this for not only human detection, but also temperature profiles of human beings. This can be applied for a variety of medical applications, including the early detection of skin cancer.”

Krishna said the list goes on to include medical imaging, corrosion detection and food safety applications.

The final task of their grant award is to train new students to take up the proverbial infrared research baton for generations to come, Krishna said.

The professor said he would like to position Ohio State as one of the only two universities in the United States with the ability to undertake “design to camera” research and development in the infrared field.

Collaborators on the project include the University of Virginia, the MIT Lincoln lab, the University of Illinois, Chicago and industry representative L-3 Cincinnati Electronics.


 

This story originally appeared on Electrical and Computer Engineering’s website: https://ece.osu.edu/news/2017/02/ece-team-wins-3-million-onr-grant-make-infrared-detector-technologies-ohio-state-tops

Grassman Wins SunShot Award to Develop High Efficiency Tandem Solar Cell

Prof. Tyler Grassman (MSE/ECE) was awarded $1,124,999 to develop a tandem solar cell with gallium arsenide phosphide (GaAsP) on silicon (Si) aimed at 30% or higher efficiency.  This research is powered by the U.S. Department of pv-module-diagram-twitterEnergy SunShot Initiative’s Photovoltaic Research and Development program and will support the development of next generation photovoltaics technology, driving solar cost reductions and reliability improvements for years to come. Prof. Grassman’s project will support the SunShot goals by developing a mature GaAsP/Si tandem cell that could be manufactured at scale via existing Si and III-V tooling and infrastructure, greatly reducing capital expenditures and revitalizing existing manufacturing industries.

 

pvrd-photo-fb The SunShot Initiative’s Photovoltaic Research and Development (PVRD) funding program pushes the limits of power conversion efficiency, fielded energy output, service lifetime, and manufacturability of commercial and emerging PV technologies.  PVRD is one of the first funding opportunities in SunShot that looks to a post-2020 goal, and it is anticipated that a second round of funding opportunities in this area wil lbe announced in October 2016.

 

Learn more about Prof. Grassman’s award: http://energy.gov/eere/sunshot/project-profile-ohio-state-university-pvrd