Fulbright Week encourages future scholars and students, celebrates past recipients

On Monday, The Ohio State University kicked off its ninth annual Fulbright Week: five days of on-campus workshops, information sessions and open houses to inform faculty and students about opportunities available through the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program.

 

Ohio State is a top Fulbright grant producing institution, with nine Fulbright Scholars and 10 Fulbright Students in the 2017-18 academic year, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education.

 

The Fulbright U.S. Scholars Program offers a catalog of awards specific to those in the field of Engineering. However, all university faculty, professionals, undergraduate and graduate student are encouraged to participate and learn more about the Fulbright and Fulbright-Hays programs.

 

Continue reading

Panel at KEEN partnership launch discusses impact of entrepreneurial engineering

Photo courtesy of the College of Engineering

KEEN partnership launch party on March 6, 2018. Photo courtesy of the College of Engineering

 

The Ohio State University recently celebrated its partnership with the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN) at a launch party hosted by the Department of Engineering Education.

 

Last summer, Ohio State became the newest member to join the KEEN network of thousands of engineering faculty aiming to equip students with a more entrepreneurial mindset by transforming institutions and curriculums. The ultimate goal is to help students develop personal, economic and societal value, fostering a lifetime of meaningful work for each graduate.

 

“It is an extraordinary honor for the Department of Engineering Education and The College of Engineering at The Ohio State University to be invited to join KEEN,” said David Williams, dean of the College of Engineering. “We look forward to infusing an entrepreneurial mindset into the thousands of young engineers whom we teach each year. The opportunity to build connections with, and learn from the other KEEN partners, will prepare our students to create value and change the world they are entering.”

 

Continue reading

Sustainable energy and student engagement intersect at INNOVATE-O-thon

 

The Ohio State University’s energy partner ENGIE challenged students to help achieve one goal: improve energy efficiency through positive behavioral changes on campus.

 

The students accepted.

 

During the latest INNOVATE-O-thon event, nearly 50 undergraduate students from varying disciplines came together, from Feb. 9 to 11 at the Institute for Materials Research (IMR) Innovation Lab on Kinnear Road, to work with representatives from ENGIE and IMR.

 

There, students formed strategies aimed to inspire fellow classmates to alter their energy consumption habits and, in turn, improve energy efficiency at the Columbus campus.

 

IMR hosted the three-day externship program in collaboration with Ohio State’s Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

 

Throughout the course of the event, students developed a myriad of concepts that were ultimately pitched to ENGIE, including mobile app and technology-based engagement efforts, education and training programs, awareness campaigns and cross-campus partnerships.

 

“I am really glad that ENGIE reached out to students to help with this,” said winning-group member Lauren Trapani, a second-year student in environment, economy, development and sustainability. “We know what is feasible to change in our behavior, and what is infeasible.”

Continue reading

Register Now: Materials Week 2018

Featured

2018 OSU Materials Week – the 10th annual showcase of materials-allied research at The Ohio State University and beyond – will be held May 8-11, 2017 at the Blackwell Inn & Conference Center on Ohio State’s Columbus campus.

 

Check here for updated information about schedules, how to register, and other pertinent information.

 

Join us! Click here to register. Our 10th annual conference features a keynote address, student poster sessions, and technical and cross cutting sessions focusing on the latest advances in the full spectrum of materials innovation.

 

 

Save the Date: October 12, Distinguished Lecturer Wayne D. Kaplan

The OSU Institute for Materials Research Distinguished Lecturer Series continues with a lecture given by Wayne D. Kaplan from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. The talk is titled “The Influence of Fields and Dopants on Grain Boundary Mobility”. It will take place in Scott Lab E100, 201 W. 19th Ave, on October 12, 2017 from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m., with light refreshments to follow.

 

Bio

 

Wayne D. Kaplan is a full professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, where he holds the Karl Stoll Chair in Advanced Materials.  Kaplan currently serves as the Executive Vice President for Research at the Technion. He completed his BSc in Mechanical Engineering, and his MSc and DSc in Materials at the Technion after immigrating to Israel from the U.S. He then spent a year as a Humboldt Fellow at the Max-Planck Institute in Stuttgart Germany before joining the Technion faculty in 1995.

 

During the past 20 years Kaplan’s research activities at the Technion have focused on the structure, chemistry and energy of interfaces between metals and ceramics, with a focus on the correlation between thermodynamics (continuum) approaches and the atomistic structure and chemistry of interfaces. In addition to his fundamental research in materials science, Kaplan works on the development of electron microscopy techniques for characterization at the sub-nanometer length-scale.

 

Kaplan is the author of more than 130 reviewed and archived scientific articles, as well as two textbooks: Joining Processes and Microstructural Characterization of Materials.  In 2006 he received the Henry Taub Prize for Academic Excellence. He is a fellow of the American Ceramic Society, a member of the Israel Microscopy Society, and was an editor of the Journal of Materials Science (Springer).

 

Abstract

 

Controlling grain size is a fundamental part of Materials Science and Engineering. While the driving force for grain growth is thought to be understood, the mechanism by which grain boundaries migrate, and how microscopic parameters affect grain boundary mobility, are less understood. This presentation focuses on the mobility of grain boundaries and how dopants and external fields influence the kinetics of grain growth.

 

The first part of the talk will address the concept of solute-drag, where conventional wisdom indicates that moving a solute cloud with a grain boundary should either slow down grain boundary motion (e.g. Mg in Al2O3), or not affect it. Model experiments at dopant levels below the experimentally determined solubility limit clearly show that some adsorbates reduce grain boundary mobility (the accepted solute-drag effect) whereas other increase grain boundary mobility (solute-acceleration). Reasons for the varying behavior are discussed within the framework of grain boundary disconnections as the mechanism by which grain boundaries move, and current approaches to understanding Gibbsian adsorption.

 

The second part of the talk reviews model experiments designed to probe the influence of external fields on grain boundary mobility. As a model system, polycrystalline SiC underwent conventional annealing, and annealing using spark plasma sintering (SPS) without pressure, and the grain size as a function of annealing time was characterized. From these experiments, the grain boundary mobility of SiC at 2100°C under conventional versus SPS annealing was determined. SPS annealing resulted in a grain boundary mobility which is three orders of magnitude larger than that resulting from conventional annealing. This indicates that the same (or similar) mechanism which promotes rapid sintering during SPS also significantly increases the rate of grain growth. This mechanism will be discussed in light of the “solute-acceleration” effect presented in the first part of the talk.

 


 

Each year, the Institute for Materials Research Distinguished Lecture Series brings world renowned materials researchers to The Ohio State University campus to share the latest developments in materials-allied fields and discuss their research with OSU students, faculty, and staff. IMR Distinguished Lecturers include the top scientists in their fields, and these lectures are advertised via campus mail, IMR listservers and IMR’s website. For more information on past lectures, visit our Distinguished Lectures page.