Girl Scouts join Ohio State engineers for sustainable energy event

 

Some members of the Girl Scouts of Ohio’s Heartland recently explored the science behind sustainable energy with engineering staff and students at The Ohio State University.

 

Girl Scouts attending “Scoping Out Solar Energy” at Ohio State’s Institute for Materials Research (IMR) Nanotech West Lab and Center for Electron Microscopy and Analysis (CEMAS) took part in discussions and hands-on science and technology activities with College of Engineering volunteers.

 

Throughout the day, the nearly 20 Girl Scouts learned about energy use, conversion and storage, as well as energy consumption of electric vehicles. The topics complemented concepts learned in school and introduced them to new ideas regarding renewable energy and electron microscopy.

 

Through each activity, the elementary school-aged girls also had an opportunity to consider their potential roles as science and engineering leaders in the future.

 

Continue reading

2018 OSU Materials Week Review

The Institute for Materials Research (IMR) welcomed one of its largest gatherings of professors, researchers and visitors to The Ohio State University for its 10th-annual OSU Materials Week.

 

Each spring, students and researchers from within and outside academia around the world share their work at the IMR event. The goal is to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration and celebrate developments in materials-allied research.

 

IMR Executive Director Steven Ringel welcomed several hundred visitors during the May 8  reception at the Blackwell Inn and Conference Center, kicking off four days of activities.

 

“OSU Materials Week is a very special event, as it is both a technical conference in which researchers share the latest in innovative materials-allied research, and a celebration of Ohio State’s material community and all of its accomplishments,” Ringel said.

 

To help integrate new faculty into the materials-allied community, the event featured two days of “cross-cutting sessions” showcasing eight of the newest Materials and Manufacturing faculty members and their work. Each joined the Ohio State this academic year.

 

“With so much breadth and depth within our campus, building a community from our local strengths and interest, and finding a way to enable easy collaboration were the primary reasons IMR started Materials Week from the outset,” Ringel said.

 

Three days of “focus sessions” allowed other faculty at Ohio State and researchers outside the university to share their work as well. During these sessions, visitors roam between talks featuring faculty from Ohio State’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering, or Chemistry and Biochemistry to Cornell University, the University of Glasgow, the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center or the Honda Research Institute, to name a few.

 

Ohio State student researchers had a chance to shine during two popular competitions: the Three Minute Thesis (3MT) and Poster Sessions. 3MT challenged five Ohio State students to effectively communicate a distilled, compelling thesis and its significance to an audience outside their specific scholarly focus in three minutes or less.

 

Videos and information about this year’s 3MT presentations are available here.

 

Nearly one hundred Ohio State undergraduate and graduate students shared their work and received feedback from professors and students of varying disciplines during the Poster Sessions, held over two days.

 

“What is really clear is that we are doing a lot of things here at Ohio State that will make a difference. And we’ve got great students going through,” said IMR Associate Director Glenn Daehn, who joined 50 volunteer faculty and postdoc judges. “It’s been a privilege and a joy to judge these kids.”

 

Photos and information about Poster Sessions award winners are available here.

 

During the awards ceremony, Ohio State Executive Vice President and Provost Bruce McPheron said IMR helps set an example at Ohio State for working across boundaries in the field of materials research.

 

“Congratulations on this long trajectory — 10 years of this event but many, many years of commitment to this way of thinking about how we turn our intellectual expertise into actual solutions for society. We are not only informing the best possible journals and our colleagues; we are actually solving problems that matter to people around the world.”

 

This year’s keynote address was given by renowned professor John A. Rogers, a Northwestern University professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, and Neurological Surgery. Rogers addressed his research of materials for bioresorbable electronics and application examples, including wireless sensors of intracranial temperature, pressure and electrophysiology designed for use in treatment of traumatic brain injury and electrical stimulators for accelerated neuroregeneration.

 

Liang-Shih Fan, professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, took home two IMR Innovation Awards: Most Patents Filed and Most Invention Disclosures Filed. Robert J. Lee, professor of pharmaceutics in the College of Pharmacy, also won Most Invention Disclosures Filed. The IMR Distinguished Service Award was given to IMR Executive Assistant Jennifer Donovan in recognition of her sustained outstanding performance in support of the institute’s vision and university’s core values.

 

The 2018 OSU Materials Week was supported by Ohio State Energy Partners (OSEP), a 50-50 joint venture between ENGIE and Axium Infrastructure; the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF Materials Research Science and Emerging Center; and the Office of Energy and Environment.

 

OSEP is set to offer direct academic collaboration support in a myriad of specific areas, including student financial aid and internships, new faculty positions and the creation of an innovation center on campus. OSEP and IMR collaborated during a February INNOVATE-O-thon event, in which nearly 40 undergraduate students from different disciplinary backgrounds worked together to generate strategies aimed to inspire classmates to alter energy consumption habits and, in turn, improve energy efficiency at the Columbus campus.

 

The Institute for Materials Research is an interdisciplinary institute that works across colleges and departments at The Ohio State University to facilitate, promote and coordinate research and infrastructure related to the science and engineering of materials.

Follow: @OhioStateIMR

 

Story by Mike Huson, IMR Public Relations Coordinator

Contact: huson.4@osu.edu

 

Top 10 posters showcasing research at Ohio State awarded during 2018 OSU Materials Week

Click a thumbnail to view the attending Top 10 Student Poster awardees with Ohio State Executive Vice President and Provost Bruce McPheron.


More than a hundred student and postdoctoral researchers at The Ohio State University came together to share their work in materials-allied fields with researchers from across the country at a two-day series of poster sessions during 2018 OSU Materials Week, held May 8 to 11.

 

The Institute for Materials Research (IMR) hosted the poster sessions to allow undergraduate and graduate students at Ohio State an opportunity to share their work and receive feedback from professors and students of varying disciplines.

 

Students, postdoctoral researchers and professors swarmed through the Blackwell Inn ballroom as judges and visitors made their ways from poster to poster. Researchers were allowed five minutes to present their research. Presentations were followed by five-minute question-and-answer sessions between small groups of judges and each presenter.

 

“My audience is usually my labmates, so they know what we are doing, why we are doing it,” said Melika Shahhosseini, a Mechanical Engineering graduate student. “But when I’m presenting to an audience out of my field, it helps me understand what people expect from my work, what they want to know about why I’m doing it. So, it makes me get better at presenting my work to people out of my field, which I think is really important.”

Continue reading

Ohio State researchers compete in Three Minute Thesis at 2018 OSU Materials Week

Left to right: Xianjie (Tony) Ren, Aamena Parulkar and Brelon May

 

How much time would you need to explain your dissertation, from the painstakingly crafted proposal to collected data, findings, and conclusion? According to the University of Queensland, an 80,000-word thesis requires about nine hours to present.

 

Master’s and doctoral students from The Ohio State University who took the stage May 8 during the opening of 2018 OSU Materials Week, however, were not given a second past the three-minute mark.

 

The Institute for Materials Research (IMR) kicked off its 10th-annual Materials Week conference with a Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, founded and registered by UQ in Australia.

 

No props. No elaborate electronic media assistance. No dumbing it down. Presenters were allowed just one static slide to accompany their orations.

 

The 3MT competition challenges students to effectively communicate a distilled, compelling thesis and its significance to an audience outside their specific scholarly focus.

 

Five Ohio State students were chosen to compete May 8 in front of hundreds of professors and researchers from across the country and within the university after being selected from a preliminary round of presentations, held a week prior.

 

3MT finalists’ backgrounds ranged from Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering to Physics.

 

Brelon May won top prize for his clear and compelling 3MT thesis, “Flexible Ultraviolet LEDs on Metal.“ May studies in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) with advisor Professor Roberto Myers.

Continue reading

Graduate students challenged to present three-minute theses at OSU Materials Week

Matt Souva (right) won top prize for his 3MT presentation at 2017 OSU Materials Week.

 

How much time would you need to explain your dissertation, from the painstakingly crafted proposal to collected data, findings, and conclusion? According to the University of Queensland, an 80,000-word thesis requires about nine hours to present.

 

Master’s and doctoral students taking the stage at 2018 OSU Materials Week, however, won’t have a second past the three-minute mark.

 

On May 8, the Institute for Materials Research (IMR) kicks off its 10th annual OSU Materials Week conference with a Three Minute Thesis (3MT) competition, founded and registered by UQ in Australia.

 

No props. No elaborate electronic media assistance. No dumbing it down. Presenters are allowed just one static slide to accompany their three-minute orations.

 

The 3MT competition is a challenge to effectively communicate a distilled, compelling thesis and its significance to an audience outside their specific scholarly focus. Hundreds of materials-allied researchers from industry and universities across the country and within The Ohio State University are attending this year’s Materials Week event.

 

Are you up for the challenge?

 

Continue reading