Save the Date: October 12, Distinguished Lecturer Wayne D. Kaplan

The OSU Institute for Materials Research Distinguished Lecturer Series continues with a lecture given by Wayne D. Kaplan from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology. The talk is titled “The Influence of Fields and Dopants on Grain Boundary Mobility”. It will take place in Scott Lab E100, 201 W. 19th Ave, on October 12, 2017 from 2 p.m. – 3 p.m., with light refreshments to follow.

 

Bio

 

Wayne D. Kaplan is a full professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, where he holds the Karl Stoll Chair in Advanced Materials.  Kaplan currently serves as the Executive Vice President for Research at the Technion. He completed his BSc in Mechanical Engineering, and his MSc and DSc in Materials at the Technion after immigrating to Israel from the U.S. He then spent a year as a Humboldt Fellow at the Max-Planck Institute in Stuttgart Germany before joining the Technion faculty in 1995.

 

During the past 20 years Kaplan’s research activities at the Technion have focused on the structure, chemistry and energy of interfaces between metals and ceramics, with a focus on the correlation between thermodynamics (continuum) approaches and the atomistic structure and chemistry of interfaces. In addition to his fundamental research in materials science, Kaplan works on the development of electron microscopy techniques for characterization at the sub-nanometer length-scale.

 

Kaplan is the author of more than 130 reviewed and archived scientific articles, as well as two textbooks: Joining Processes and Microstructural Characterization of Materials.  In 2006 he received the Henry Taub Prize for Academic Excellence. He is a fellow of the American Ceramic Society, a member of the Israel Microscopy Society, and was an editor of the Journal of Materials Science (Springer).

 

Abstract

 

Controlling grain size is a fundamental part of Materials Science and Engineering. While the driving force for grain growth is thought to be understood, the mechanism by which grain boundaries migrate, and how microscopic parameters affect grain boundary mobility, are less understood. This presentation focuses on the mobility of grain boundaries and how dopants and external fields influence the kinetics of grain growth.

 

The first part of the talk will address the concept of solute-drag, where conventional wisdom indicates that moving a solute cloud with a grain boundary should either slow down grain boundary motion (e.g. Mg in Al2O3), or not affect it. Model experiments at dopant levels below the experimentally determined solubility limit clearly show that some adsorbates reduce grain boundary mobility (the accepted solute-drag effect) whereas other increase grain boundary mobility (solute-acceleration). Reasons for the varying behavior are discussed within the framework of grain boundary disconnections as the mechanism by which grain boundaries move, and current approaches to understanding Gibbsian adsorption.

 

The second part of the talk reviews model experiments designed to probe the influence of external fields on grain boundary mobility. As a model system, polycrystalline SiC underwent conventional annealing, and annealing using spark plasma sintering (SPS) without pressure, and the grain size as a function of annealing time was characterized. From these experiments, the grain boundary mobility of SiC at 2100°C under conventional versus SPS annealing was determined. SPS annealing resulted in a grain boundary mobility which is three orders of magnitude larger than that resulting from conventional annealing. This indicates that the same (or similar) mechanism which promotes rapid sintering during SPS also significantly increases the rate of grain growth. This mechanism will be discussed in light of the “solute-acceleration” effect presented in the first part of the talk.

 


 

Each year, the Institute for Materials Research Distinguished Lecture Series brings world renowned materials researchers to The Ohio State University campus to share the latest developments in materials-allied fields and discuss their research with OSU students, faculty, and staff. IMR Distinguished Lecturers include the top scientists in their fields, and these lectures are advertised via campus mail, IMR listservers and IMR’s website. For more information on past lectures, visit our Distinguished Lectures page.

Did you miss out on OSU Materials Week?

 

Don’t worry! Check out the “Materials Week in Review” to see the highlights of Materials Week.

And if you couldn’t make it to the Three Minute Thesis competition, check out the awesome student finalists who presented during Materials Week. Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ) whereby PhD students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance. 3MT challenges students to consolidate their ideas and research discoveries so they can be presented concisely to a non-specialist audience. All participants did a wonderful job presenting to our panel of judges.

 

The six finalists for the 3-Minute Thesis competition were Ryan Buntain, Sarah Bushman, Xinpeng Du, Bryan Esser, Xianje (Tony) Ren and Matthew Souva.

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Join us for 2017 OSU Materials Week – May 9-12

2017 OSU Materials Week – the annual showcase of materials-allied research at The Ohio State University and beyond – will be held May 9-12, 2017 at the Blackwell Inn and Conference Center on Ohio State’s Columbus campus.

 

Our 9th annual conference features a keynote address, student poster sessions, and technical and cross cutting sessions focusing on the latest advances in the full spectrum of materials innovation:

 

  • Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability
  • Materials Innovation
  • Materials and Nanostructures for Magnetic Skyrmions
  • Integrated Design of Materials
  • Nanoengineered Materials for Medical Applications
  • Innovations in Advanced Microscopy
  • Wide Bandgap Semiconductors

 

Featuring
IMR Keynote Address by

Ayodhya N. Tiwari
Solar Electricity: Advancements and Opportunities with Innovative Emerging Technologies

Tuesday, May 9 at 2:00 PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information on 2017 OSU Materials Week, including registration, agenda and program guide, visit: go.osu.edu/2017OSUMaterialsWeek

COSI Academy Students Experience Science in Action at Nanotech West

IMR staff recently hosted a group of high school students from COSI Academy, an exploration program for high school students interested in STEM and STEM related careers.  Run through the Center for Science and Industry (COSI), Columbus’ science museum, the COSI Academy connects students with professionals in the areas of engineering, biotechnology and health and medicine through site visits to local science-based corporations, organizations, and universities, guest speakers, and hands-on activities.

COSI Academy students watch an instrumentation demonstration at Nanotech West Lab – courtesy of the Center for Science and Industry (COSI)

 

Twelve students toured the Nanotech West Lab facility on April 8, including its cleanroom and Materials Innovation Lab, and learned about different career paths in STEM fields. Nanotech West Lab is Ohio State’s nanofabrication research facility and the largest and most comprenhesive micro- and nanotechnology user facility in the state of Ohio. The lab is home to more than 50 large pieces of user accessible material synthesis, fabrication and metrology equipment and research capabilities include e-beam lithography, nanolithography, device fabrication, MOCVD epitaxy, device processing, and clean room processing.

 

IMR Member of Technical Staff Aimee Price discusses nanotechnology with COSI Academy students in the Materials Innovation Lab – courtesy of the Center for Science and Industry (COSI)

COSI Academy students gowned up to tour the Nanotech West cleanroom – courtesy of the Center for Science and Industry (COSI)

 

This outreach event was well received by the COSI Academy students and their chaperones, and our staff enjoyed the opportunity to share their work with the next generation of scientists. Students particularly enjoyed the monochromator demonstration by Nanotech West engineer Dave Hollingshead, and seeing the plotter in action on the feature wall of the Materials Innovation Lab.

 

Senior Technology Integrator Kari Roth explains the Materials Innovation model being developed through IMR’s Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability program – courtesy of the Center for Science and Industry (COSI)

All photos courtesy of the Center for Science and Industry (COSI)

M&MS Hosts New Faculty Welcome Event

IMR recently hosted a welcome event for the nine new faculty members who have joined The Ohio State University through our Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability  (M&MS) program. The event was informative as well as social – an opportunity for the faculty hires to meet and learn more about their research endeavors.

New faculty hired through the Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) program attended an informal gathering in the Materials Innovation Lab

With five of the new hires starting in January 2017, this informal gathering, held at our Materials Innovation Lab on Kinnear Road, was the first official event where all of the faculty hires were able to meet one another and discuss their backgrounds and research interests.  Steve Ringel, IMR Executive Director and M&MS Faculty Director, offered a brief presentation with an overview of the M&MS initiative, its goals and activities to date, and IMR’s programs and opportunities.

Steve Ringel, IMR Executive Director and M&MS Faculty Director, provides an overview of IMR and M&MS

Presentation slide showing the building of the M&MS faculty cohort with its first nine hires

Each M&MS faculty member then shared a short, one slide presentation introducing their work, followed by additional time to network and discuss opportunities for collaboration.

Professor Jeanie (Chun Ning) Lau, Physics, discusses her research activities

The nine M&MS faculty hires who joined The Ohio State University during the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 academic years are:

 

  • Marc Bockrath, Professor, Physics
  • Carolin Fink, Assistant Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
  • Ned Hill, Professor, Public Affairs, City and Regional Planning
  • John Horack, Neil Armstrong Chair in Aerospace Policy and Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Glenn College of Public Policy
  • Joerg Jinschek, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering
  • Jung-Hyun Kim, Assistant Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering
  • Sanjay Krishna, George R. Smith Chair in Engineering and Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering
  • Chun Ning (Jeanie) Lau, Professor, Physics
  • Farhang Pourboghrat, Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Integrated Systems Engineering

 

With twelve additional faculty searches currently active, we continue to build the Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability cohort of people, research and innovation within our Discovery Themes program.

 

Steve Ringel, Dr. Jay Sayre (Assistant Vice President of M&MS), and M&MS Professor Farhang Pourboghrat

Professor Sanjay Krishna and Jay Sayre

New M&MS Professors Carolin Fink and Joerg Jinschek