Did you miss out on OSU Materials Week?

 

Don’t worry! Check out the “Materials Week in Review” to see the highlights of Materials Week.

And if you couldn’t make it to the Three Minute Thesis competition, check out the awesome student finalists who presented during Materials Week. Three Minute Thesis (3MT®) is a research communication competition developed by The University of Queensland (UQ) whereby PhD students have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis and its significance. 3MT challenges students to consolidate their ideas and research discoveries so they can be presented concisely to a non-specialist audience. All participants did a wonderful job presenting to our panel of judges.

 

The six finalists for the 3-Minute Thesis competition were Ryan Buntain, Sarah Bushman, Xinpeng Du, Bryan Esser, Xianje (Tony) Ren and Matthew Souva.

 

Matthew Souva won the competition, while Xinpeng Du and Xianje (Tony) Ren tied for second place. Additionally, Silvia Duarte-Sanmiguel was the recipient of the People’s Choice Award.

 

The full videos for each of the six finalists are below:


Ryan Buntain, Materials Science and Engineering
“Hydrogen Assisted Cracking in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection”

 


Sarah Bushman, Biomedical Engineering
“DNA Origami Force Sensor”

 


Xinpeng Du, Materials Science and Engineering
“Facile Measurement of Single-Crystal Elastic Constants from Polycrystalline Samples”

 


Bryan Esser, Materials Science and Engineering
“From Atoms to Jet Engines: Understanding Structure-Property Relationships from the Ground Up”

 


Xianjie (Tony) Ren, Food, Agricultural & Biological Engineering
“Reinforcing Effect of Eggshell on Guayule Natural Rubber”

 


Matthew Souva, Chemical and Biomedical Engineering
“High Throughput Block Copolymer Nanoparticle Assembly Methods and Morphologies”

 

 


2017 OSU Materials Week is hosted by the Institute for Materials Research and its Materials and Manufacturing for Sustainability (M&MS) program. We are grateful for generous support from the Center for Emergent Materials, an NSF Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC) and the Office of Energy and Environment.

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